Interstellar Movie 2014

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Interstellar Movie 2014

Two years after delivering the final entry of his Dark Knight trilogy, The Dark Knight Rises, Christopher Nolan gave the masses Interstellar, his second foray into the realm of science fiction. Set in a dystopian future, the movie follows Matthew McConaughey's Joseph Cooper, an astronaut who embarks into the depths of space with his team to go through a wormhole near Saturn so that they can find a new home for humanity, resulting in a temporally-bending chain of consequences. Back on the increasingly desolate Earth, we also follow along with Joseph's daughter, Murphy, who continues to await her father's return and tries to fix Earth's problems her own way.

It's a beautiful and devastating film, allowing Christopher Nolan to continue to push himself in bold, invigorating ways while also appearing to be one of the more personal films in Nolan's resume, touching on the connections we lose while we push ourselves farther and father into our work, and how our inherent desire to be at the forefront of humanity's greatness can often remove us from what makes us human in the first place.
It's a rich movie to dissect, and it's clear that Nolan had big ambitions here. Unfortunately, though, some of those ambitions can get a little too heavy-handed and a bit too broad-reaching, resulting in an occasionally messy and over-extended film that doesn't entirely reach the full scope of its huge, incredible desires.
Interstellar is often a long and frustrating film, one that is often at the peak of greatness but never fully accomplishing what it sets out to achieve. There is a tremendous amount to appreciate, particularly from its great performances of its talented ensemble to its rousing score and stunning cinematography. And it is clearly a movie that intriguingly challenges what one can accomplish in a single film, resulting in Nolan's arguably biggest and most elaborate film.
But while Interstellar has a lot working in its favor, the downsides are often glaring. And while it is an intriguing step forward (in many respects) for the acclaimed director, it's also one that doesn't quite get fully out of the stratosphere or prove itself to be one of Nolan's most engaging or impeccable films — though it's arguably one of his most meaningful.